Monday, July 2, 2012

Website Spotlight: American Journeys


Website URL: http://www.americanjourneys.org/

Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

In this post, I limit myself to those specific aspects of the website which I find fit particularly well within our face-to-face class sessions (each student is required to bring a laptop to class) or as the basis for the students' regularly-assigned written reactions.

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Material on this website was initially designed to help students prepare for 2002 National History Day.

I ask the students to work through the following links:

I. Excellent "Help" page
http://www.americanjourneys.org/help.asp

II. Let's take an example of how to work with any given document:

1. Go to the "Find a Document" tab at the top of the screen:
http://www.americanjourneys.org/texts.asp

This screen shows all the documents (listed in chronological order) contained on the American Journeys website.

2. For our example, let's choose the 1493 "Letter of Christopher Columbus to Ferdinand and Isabella."

Click on the AJ (American Journeys) number, AJ-064, for that particular document.

3. This step takes you to the AJ-604 Document page.
http://www.americanjourneys.org/aj-064/index.asp

4. We can click on "Read This Document" to pull up the document itself.
http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/aj&CISOPTR=4512

5. But for me, the most exciting part of this website is the "Read Background" material for each document.

Click on "Read Background" for AJ-604.
http://www.americanjourneys.org/aj-064/summary/index.asp

Notice all the great information on this screen:

a. Author Note
b. Event(s) pertinent to the specific document
c. Document Note
d. Other Internet or Reference Sources

III. Choosing a Topic
http://www.americanjourneys.org/teachers/choosetopic.html

IV. Geography
http://www.americanjourneys.org/teachers/geography.html

V. Interpretation: How Could They Think That? The Problem of Worldview
http://www.americanjourneys.org/teachers/interpretation.html

VI. Sensitive Content
http://www.americanjourneys.org/teachers/sensitive.html

~~For a review of this website:

TeachingHistory.org (National History Education Clearinghouse)
http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/website-reviews/14721
 
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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post fits mostly within the following U.S. History survey course module on the wiki:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Exploration

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT 

Website Spotlight: Constitutional Convention


Website URL: http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/
 
Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

In this post, I limit myself to those specific aspects of the website which I find fit particularly well within our face-to-face class sessions (each student is required to bring a laptop to class) or as the basis for the students' regularly-assigned written reactions.

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I ask the students to work through the following links from this superb website developed by Gordon Lloyd:

1. Biographical sketches of Framers
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/delegates/alpha.html

2. Age of Framers 
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/delegates/age.html

3. Educational Backgrounds of Framers
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/delegates/education.html

4. Continental Experiences of Framers
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/delegates/experience.html

5. Christy's Portrait: Interactive Scene at the Signing of the Constitution
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/christy/
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/christy-about.html

6. Interactive Map of Philadelphia
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/map/

Click on each location to learn about the Founding Fathers in Historic Philadelphia.

Here are some of the ones you might especially enjoy reading about:

Start at top right, move left on each horizontal street.

Mrs. Dailey's Boarding House
John Dunlap's Print Shop. [Notice that items were printed in German.]
Indian Queen Tavern
Mary House's Boarding House
Robert Morris's Town Home
Graff House. Thomas Jefferson
City Tavern
Mrs. Marshall's Boarding House.
Independence Hall
Philadelphia Debtors' Prison. Robert Morris [see his Town Home above]

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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post fits within the following U.S. History survey course module on the wiki:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Constitution

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT 

Saturday, June 30, 2012

Website Spotlight: God in America


Website URL: http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/

Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

In this post, I limit myself to those specific aspects of the website which I find fit particularly well within our face-to-face class sessions (each student is required to bring a laptop to class) or as the basis for the students' regularly-assigned written reactions.

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I ask the students to work through the following links--at the appropriate time in the semester when the material is applicable:

I. Colonial Era

The Protestant Reformation
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/protestant-reformation.html

A New Adam (Puritan period)
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/study-guide/one.html

The Pilgrims
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/pilgrims.html

John Winthrop
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/john-winthrop.html

Interview with Professor Stephen Marini
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/interviews/stephen-marini.html#winthrop

The Puritans
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/puritans.html
Paul Boyer interview
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/apocalypse/explanation/puritans.html

Anne Hutchinson
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/anne-hutchinson.html

Roger Williams
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/roger-williams.html

Jonathan Edwards
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/jonathan-edwards.html

George Whitefield
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/george-whitefield.html

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II. Second Great Awakening

Charles Finney
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/charles-finney.html

James Finley (Circuit Rider)
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/james-finley.html

Evangelicalism, Revivalism, and the Second Great Awakening
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/nineteen/nkeyinfo/nevanrev.htm

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III. Slavery

Angelina and Sarah Grimke
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/angelina-grimke.html

Nat Turner
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/nat-turner.html

Frederick Douglass
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/frederick-douglass.html

Harriet Beecher Stowe
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/harriet-beecher-stowe.html

Sojourner Truth
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/sojourner-truth.html

Harriet Tubman
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/harriet-tubman.html

William Lloyd Garrison
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/william-lloyd-garrison.html

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IV. Reform

Lyman Beecher (Benevolent Empire)
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/lyman-beecher.html

Susan B. Anthony
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/susan-b-anthony.html

Elizabeth Cady Stanton
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/elizabeth-cady-stanton.html

Lucretia Mott
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/lucretia-mott.html

Frances Willard (Women's Christian Temperance Union)
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/frances-willard.html

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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post fits within several U.S. History survey course modules on my wiki:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Colonial+Era
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Slavery
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Reform

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT 

Website Spotlight: Massachusetts Historical Society


Website URL: http://www.masshist.org/revolution/

Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

In this post, I limit myself to those specific aspects of the website which I find fit particularly well within our face-to-face class sessions (each student is required to bring a laptop to class) or as the basis for the students' regularly-assigned written reactions.

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How This Site is Structured
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/teachers/about.php#structured

The heart of the website highlights 15 topics: An overview essay puts each topic in context--with links to specific documents.
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/topics.php

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I ask the students to work through the following links:

Sugar Act
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/sugar.php

Stamp Act
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/stamp.php

Formation of the Sons of Liberty
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/sons_of_liberty.php

Townshend Acts
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/townshend.php

Non-Consumption and Non-Importation
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/non_importation.php

Boston Massacre
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/massacre.php

Formation of the Committees of Correspondence
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/committees.php

Boston Tea Party
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/teaparty.php

Coercive Acts
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/coercive.php

First Continental Congress
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/congress1.php

Lexington and Concord
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/lexington.php

Second Continental Congress
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/congress2.php

Battle of Bunker Hill
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/bunkerhill.php

Washington Takes Command of the Continental Army
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/washington.php

Declaration of Independence
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/declarations.php

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Excerpts from John Rowe's Diary (the excerpts are blended into the 15 topics)
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/resources/rowes.php

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Check out these lesson plans:

Forces arguing for conflict versus those hoping to compromise
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/teachers/lessons/lesson_concept_4a.php

History did not have to happen the way it did. Counter-factual
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/teachers/lessons/lesson_concept_8.php

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Useful Links: This is done very completely
http://www.masshist.org/revolution/resources/useful_links.php

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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post fits within the following U.S. History survey course module on the wiki:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Road+to+Revolution

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT 

Friday, June 29, 2012

Website Spotlight: Religion and the Founding of the American Republic


Website URL: http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/overview.html

Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

In this post, I limit myself to those specific aspects of the website which I find fit particularly well within our face-to-face class sessions (each student is required to bring a laptop to class) or as the basis for the students' regularly-assigned written reactions.

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I ask the students to work through the following links--at the point in the semester when appropriate:

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America as a Religious Refuge: The 17th-Century

Part 1:
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01.html

Read the entire screen:

European Persecution
Crossing the Ocean to Keep the Faith: the Puritans
The Bible Commonwealths

Part 2:
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01-2.html

Read the entire screen:

Persecution in America
Jews Find a Refuge in America
The Quakers
The Pennsylvania Germans
Roman Catholics in Maryland
Virginia

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Religion in 18th-Century America
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel02.html

1. Read the Introduction.

2. You can skip the section entitled "The Appearance of Eighteenth-Century Churches."

3. Deal with "Deism" briefly.

4. Then spend most of your time on the remainder of the page:

"The Emergence of American Evangelicalism: The [First] Great Awakening"

George Whitefield
Jonathan Edwards
The Revival of Northampton
Sinners Warned
Transatlantic Evangelicalism
Criticism of other ministers
The Baptists
Francis Asbury
Beginning of the Methodists
Organization of the Methodists

See also:

Article by professor Christine Heyrman on The First Great Awakening
http://www.nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/eighteen/ekeyinfo/grawaken.htm

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Religion and the American Revolution
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel03.html

Read the entire screen:

Religion as Cause of the Revolution
Jonathan Mayhew
Resistance to Tyranny as a Christian Duty
Revolution Understood in Scriptural Terms
The Plot to Land a Bishop
Revolution Justified by God
A Minister in Arms
A Fighting Parson
A Revolutionary Chaplain
Revolutionary Battle Flag
John Witherspoon
A Quaker Schism
Free Quaker Meeting House
The Problems of the American Anglicans

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Religion and the New Republic
2nd Great Awakening
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel07.html

Read the entire screen:

I. Introductory paragraphs:

The Atheist's Bible
Paine Rebuked
The Tree of Life

II. The Camp Meeting:

Outdoor Communion
Camp Meeting Plan
Religious Revival in America

III. The Emergence of the African American Church:

Woman Preacher of the A.M.E. Church
Christian Charity
Absalom Jones
Religious Exuberance
Jerking Exercise
The Shakers

IV. The Mormons:

The Book of Mormon
The Murder of Joseph and Hiram Smith
Migration to Utah

V. Benevolent Societies:

Missions to Sailors
Missionaries' Reports
Circuit Preaching
A Thousand Years of Happiness

See also:

Evangelicalism in Antebellum America
http://investigatinghistory.ashp.cuny.edu/m4.html

Evangelicalism, Revivalism, and the Second Great Awakening
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/nineteen/nkeyinfo/nevanrev.htm

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~~For a review of this overall website:

TeachingHistory.org (National History Education Clearinghouse)
http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/website-reviews/14649

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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post fits within several U.S. History survey course modules on my wiki:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Colonial+Era
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Road+to+Revolution
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Reform

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT 

Website Spotlight: The West


Website URL: http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/program/

Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

In this post, I limit myself to those specific aspects of the website which I find fit particularly well within our face-to-face class sessions (each student is required to bring a laptop to class) or as the basis for the students' regularly-assigned written reactions.

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I ask the students to work through the following links:

I. People:
http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/people/

Stephen F. Austin
William Clark
Francisco Coronado
Charles Crocker
Charles Goodnight
Sam Houston
Meriwether Lewis
James K. Polk
Sacagawea
Antonio López de Santa Anna
Father Junipero Serra
Joseph Smith
Leland Stanford
Levi Strauss
John Sutter
Frederick Jackson Turner
Narcissa and Marcus Whitman
Brigham Young

II. Events Timeline
http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/events/

Extensive, very well done timeline.

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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post fits within the following U.S. History survey course module on the wiki:

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT 

Website Spotlight: National Humanities Center (Toolbox Library)


Website URL: http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/index.htm

Introductory Note:

Welcome to one in a series of posts which spotlight quality websites that I use with my U.S. History survey course students (I also used this particular website extensively in an upper-division course on Colonial America) at Azusa Pacific University to enrich the regular material in our learning modules.

This site has been absolutely incredibly useful to me, as it offers numerous "collections of primary resources — historical documents, literary texts, and works of art — thematically organized with notes and discussion questions."

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I built an entire semester course on Colonial America around these two particular modules:

American Beginnings: European Presence in North America, 1492-1690
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/amerbegin/index.htm

Topic 1: Contact
Topic 2: Exploration
Topic 3: Settlement
Topic 4: Permanence
Topic 5: Power

Becoming American: The British Atlantic Colonies, 1690-1763
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/becomingamer/index.htm

Topic 1: Growth
Topic 2: Peoples
Topic 3: Economies
Topic 4: Ideas
Topic 5: American

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I have used selections from these other modules with profit:

Living the Revolution: America, 1789-1820
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/livingrev/index.htm

Topic 1: Predicaments of Early Republican Life
Topic 2: Religion
Topic 3: Politics
Topic 4: Expansion
Topic 5: Equality

The Triumph of Nationalism / The House Dividing: America, 1815-1850
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/triumphnationalism/index.htm

Topic 1: Culture of the Common Man
Topic 2: The Cult of Domesticity
Topic 3: Religion
Topic 4: Expansion
Topic 5: America in 1850

The Gilded and the Gritty: America, 1870-1912
http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/gilded/index.htm

Topic 1: Memory
Topic 2: Progress
Topic 3: People
Topic 4: Power
Topic 5: Empire

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~~For reviews of this website

Richard Byrne (Free Tech 4 Teachers)
http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2010/11/national-humanities-center-toolbox.html
TeachingHistory.org (National History Education Clearinghouse)
http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/website-reviews/23598

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Concluding Note:

I hope you will use this blog post in conjunction with both the modules on my Learning Professor wiki and the numerous other posts in my Website Spotlight series.

1. The website spotlighted in this post can fit within several of the U.S. History survey course modules on my wiki, but most usefully on this one:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/Colonial+Era

2. The other blog posts in my Website Spotlight series--chronologically displayed by U.S. History survey course module-- can be found on this wiki page:
http://thelearningprofessor.wikispaces.com/WEBSITE+SPOTLIGHT